A Check Up on U.S. Global Health Policy, After One Year of the Trump Administration

A Check Up on U.S. Global Health Policy, After One Year of the Trump Administration

After a decade of increases under the Bush and Obama administrations, changes to and proposed funding cuts for U.S. global health policy under the Trump administration will have significant implications for global health and development, an issue brief from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds. Based on the January 2018 Kaiser Health Tracking Poll (25 pages, PDF), the brief, A Check Up on U.S. Global Health Policy, After One Year of the Trump Administration (6 pages, PDF), found that while more than half of Americans said the U.S. should take a "leading" (13 percent) or "major" (41 percent) role with respect to improving health in developing countries, 12 percent said it should play "no role at all." And while 30 percent and 29 percent believed the U.S. was spending too little or the right amount on global health efforts, 33 percent believed it was spending too much. The brief finds that the administration's proposed cuts of more than $2 billion, or 23 percent, to global health funding would result in many more infections and deaths from HIV and TB, as well as an increase in the number of abortions performed and in maternal mortality rates. The report also notes that the administration has reinstated the so-called Mexico City Policy, which restricts more than $7 billion in funding for NGOs that provide abortion counselling or referrals, advocate to decriminalize abortion, or are working to expand abortion services, and has withheld funding for the United Nations Population Fund, the UN agency focused on global population and reproductive health.