Appleseed Network: Protecting Girls of Color From the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Appleseed Network: Protecting Girls of Color From the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Girls of color, especially African-American girls, are disciplined at a much higher rate and more severely at school than their white peers, a report from the Appleseed Network, a network of nonprofits in the United States and Mexico working to advance social and legal justice, finds. Based on data collected by the U.S. Department of Education in 2015, the report, Appleseed Network: Protecting Girls of Color From the School-to-Prison Pipeline (11 pages, PDF), analyzes racial disparities in discipline in five categories — in-school suspensions, out-of-school suspensions, expulsions, referrals to law enforcement, and school-related arrests — in Alabama, Kansas, and Massachusetts. According to the report, Black girls are 3.7 times as likely to be disciplined as white girls in Alabama, 6.2 times as likely in Kansas, and 3.9 times as likely in Massachusetts, with Alabama recording five times as many in-school-related arrests among Black female students as among their white peers, Kansas recording 13.8 times as many expulsions, and Massachusetts recording five times as many out-of-school suspensions and expulsions. According to the report's authors, more consistent data collection and transparency around the data are needed if we want to better understand how current school discipline practices funnel girls of color into the criminal justice system, address racial inequities in school discipline, and prevent girls of color from being caught up in the school-to-prison pipeline.

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