'Artful Living: Examining the Relationship Between Artistic Practice and Subjective Wellbeing Across Three National Surveys'

'Artful Living: Examining the Relationship Between Artistic Practice and Subjective Wellbeing Across Three National Surveys'

Participation in the arts is associated with higher levels of satisfaction with life, a more positive self-image, less anxiety about change, and more openness toward others, a report from the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise & Public Policy at Vanderbilt University finds. Based on an analysis of survey data among U.S. adults, undergraduate seniors, and former arts students, the report, Artful Living: Examining the Relationship Between Artistic Practice and Subjective Wellbeing Across Three National Surveys (33 pages, PDF), found that the relationship between artistic practice and well-being is strengthened by increased participation in the arts. The report also found that historically disadvantaged social groups such as people of color and women who participate in the arts see even greater increases in well-being than whites and men do. On the other hand, the report found that former art students who continue to produce art but do not feel  they have adequate time for artmaking are less satisfied than those who do not make art at all.