Broken Promises to Our Children: A State-by-State Look at the 1998 Tobacco Settlement

Broken Promises to Our Children: A State-by-State Look at the 1998 Tobacco Settlement

Despite an e-cigarette epidemic that threatens to undermine progress in reducing youth tobacco use, most states continue to shortchange programs aimed at preventing kids from using tobacco products, a report from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the American Cancer Society-Cancer Action Network, the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Truth Initiative finds. The report, Broken Promises to Our Children: A State-by-State Look at the 1998 Tobacco Settlement, found that in fiscal year 2020 states will collect $27.2 billion from the 1998 settlement and tobacco taxes yet spend only $739.7 million on tobacco prevention and cessation programs — just 2.7 percent of the total and less than a quarter of the amount recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No state currently funds prevention and cessation programs at CDC-recommended levels, while only six provide even half the recommended amount: California (93.7 percent), Alaska (89.6 percent), Maine (74.4 percent), North Dakota (55.5 percent), Delaware (51.2 percent), and Oklahoma (51.2 percent). According to the report, California's high school smoking rates fell to a record-low 2 percent in 2018.