Changing Patterns of Contraceptive Use and the Decline in Rates of Pregnancy and Birth Among U.S. Adolescents, 2007–2014

Changing Patterns of Contraceptive Use and the Decline in Rates of Pregnancy and Birth Among U.S. Adolescents, 2007–2014

Improvements in contraceptive use were a key factor in the decline in pregnancy risk among adolescent women in the United States between 2007 and 2014, a report from the Guttmacher Institute finds. The report, Changing Patterns of Contraceptive Use and the Decline in Rates of Pregnancy and Birth Among U.S. Adolescents, 2007–2014, estimated trends in pregnancy risk using national data on behaviors of women between the ages of 15 and 19 and found that changes in sexual activity and contraception use tracked relatively closely with declines in pregnancy and birth rates. According to the analysis, between 2007 and 2014 the share of 15- to 19-year-olds who had used one or more contraceptive methods the last time they had sex rose from 78 percent to 88 percent, while the use of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods increased from 1 percent to 7 percent and the share of teens who had had sex in the last three months remained unchanged at 31 percent.

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