Closed Doors: Black and Latino Students Are Excluded From Top Public Universities

Closed Doors: Black and Latino Students Are Excluded From Top Public Universities

African-American and Latino students are disproportionately underrepresented at the nation’s top public research universities and overrepresented at less selective public universities and community colleges — whose graduation rates are lower and where post-graduation job options are limited, a report from the Center for American Progress finds. According to the report, Closed Doors: Black and Latino Students Are Excluded From Top Public Universities (21 pages, PDF), the high percentage of black and Latino students attending colleges with lower graduation rates translate into lower rates of college success: only 21 percent and 16 percent of black and Latino young adults have bachelor's degrees, compared with 43 percent of white and 63 percent of Asian-American young adults. The report also finds that African-American college students in North Carolina, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Arkansas, and Texas are least likely to be enrolled at a top public research university, while Latino college students are least likely to be enrolled at one in New York, Massachusetts, California, New Jersey, and Texas. If the higher education system in the U.S. is to meaningfully contribute to greater social mobility, the report argues, prospective students must be provided with college counseling that guides them to schools matching their academic potential and better financial aid advice.