Conscience, Community and Citizenship: Religious Pluralism in an Age of Religious Nationalism

Conscience, Community and Citizenship: Religious Pluralism in an Age of Religious Nationalism

At a moment in American history marked by vitriolic rhetoric that has stoked hatred toward and violence against minorities, there is an urgent need for Americans to cross lines of difference and build coalitions around shared narratives of citizenship, a report from the Aspen Institute finds. The report, Conscience, Community and Citizenship: Religious Pluralism in an Age of Religious Nationalism (15 pages, PDF), presents highlights from a 2018 symposium hosted by the Aspen Institute Inclusive America Projectc that explored questions such as: What characteristics of engagement should we express through our words and actions? And what skill sets are required for cross-cultural and religious literacy so we can engage, respect, and protect the "other"? In addition to the need to build coalitions, takeaways from the discussions include the importance of improving "religious literacy" — starting with learning more about one's own faith tradition, making an effort to cross political as well as religious lines, providing funding for local efforts and civil society institutions that are working to advance policies that support pluralism, and connecting those efforts to national efforts.

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