Do Americans face greater mental health and economic consequences from COVID-19?

Do Americans face greater mental health and economic consequences from COVID-19?

As of May, Americans were more likely than people in nine other high-income countries to report mental health concerns and economic challenges as a result of COVID-19, an issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund finds. Based on a survey of 8,259 adults conducted between March and May in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, the brief, Do Americans Face Greater Mental Health and Economic Consequences from COVID-19? Comparing the U.S. with Other High-Income Countries, found that 33 percent of U.S. respondents reported "experiencing stress, anxiety, or great sadness that was difficult to cope with alone since the outbreak started," compared with 26 percent in Canada and the UK, 24 percent in France, 23 percent in Australia and New Zealand, 18 percent in Sweden, 14 percent in the Netherlands, and 10 percent in Norway. Americans (31 percent) also were the most likely to report being unable to pay for basic necessities such as food, heat, or rent, and/or using up their savings or borrowing money because of the pandemic, followed by Canadians (24 percent) and Australians (21 percent). Of U.S. respondents who said they were experiencing economic difficulties, 56 percent also said they were dealing with mental health issues, compared with 53 percent in the UK and 50 percent in Australia and Canada. And among U.S. and UK respondents who felt they needed and wanted mental health care, only 31 percent and 32 percent were able to receive help from a professional, compared with 47 percent in Canada and 54 percent in Australia.

(Photo credit: Commonwealth Fund)