New Orleans Ten Years After the Storm: The Kaiser Family Foundation Katrina Survey Project

New Orleans Ten Years After the Storm: The Kaiser Family Foundation Katrina Survey Project

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent levee failure led to unprecedented destruction in New Orleans, residents are optimistic and rate recovery efforts positively, but racial disparities in economic opportunities remain, a survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and National Public Radio finds. The report, New Orleans Ten Years After The Storm: The Kaiser Family Foundation Katrina Survey Project (27 pages, PDF or HTML), found that 78 percent of respondents were optimistic about the city's future; 73 percent said recovery and rebuilding efforts are going in the right direction; and 54 percent said the city has mostly recovered from Katrina, up from 39 percent five years ago — although whites (70 percent) were far more likely than African Americans (44 percent) to say so. The survey also found that respondents were more likely to say recovery efforts have helped wealthy (43 percent) and white (42 percent) residents "a lot" than to say they have helped poor people (17 percent) "a lot." In addition, African-American respondents were far more likely than their white counterparts to report financial and unemployment problems and far less likely to say that it was a good time for children to be growing up in New Orleans or that the city offers good career opportunities for young people.