Philadelphia's Immigrants: Who They Are and How They Are Changing the City

Philadelphia's Immigrants: Who They Are and How They Are Changing the City

More than a quarter of all Philadelphians — some 390,000 people as of 2016 — are either immigrants or the children of immigrants, including about one in four children under the age of 18, a report from the Pew Charitable Trusts finds. According to the report, Philadelphia's Immigrants: Who They Are and How They Are Changing the City (39 pages, PDF), more than 232,000 Philadelphia residents were born abroad, up 69 percent from 2000 and representing nearly 15 percent of the city's population, 19 percent of its workers, and 14 percent of those living in poverty, while the poverty rate among immigrants was 24 percent. Moreover, immigrants are largely responsible for the city's growth in residents and workers, although they also have added to the number of poor, less educated, and less English-proficient residents. According to the report, approximately 40 percent of Philadelphia's immigrants were from Asia, 33 percent from the Americas, 17 percent from Europe, and 10 percent from Africa. The report also found that among foreign born adults age 25 and older, 18 percent had a bachelor's degree and 13 percent had a graduate degree, compared with 17 percent and 12 percent, respectively, among native-born Philadelphians.

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