Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: 2020 Supplement

Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: 2020 Supplement

Inequities in the K–12 education system limit postsecondary opportunities for many Black students and often create an uneven playing field for those who matriculate, a report from the American Council on Education finds. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the report, Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: 2020 Supplement (280 pages, PDF), examines more than a hundred and fifty indicators of academic experience and outcomes — across pre-college, postsecondary and technical, and graduate and professional education — and finds that Black students, who are disproportionately more likely than white students to attend underfunded elementary and secondary schools, are less likely to be prepared for college-level work, to complete postsecondary credentials in higher-paying fields, and to go on to graduate school. A follow-up to the 2019 Race and Ethnicity in Higher Education: A Status Report, the study also found that African-American, Latinx, and Native American students are significantly more likely than their Asian and white peers to enroll at for-profit institutions and to take out loans for larger amounts than they might at not-for-profit institutions. Black students — whether at a public, private, or for-profit college — also are more likely than other groups to borrow for their education and to have difficulty repaying their loans, which may be hindering intergenerational upward mobility even for those with a college degree.