Racial Segregation in the San Francisco Bay Area, Part 4: The Harmful Effects of Segregation

Racial Segregation in the San Francisco Bay Area, Part 4: The Harmful Effects of Segregation

Residents of segregated African-American and Latinx neighborhoods in the Bay Area experience significantly poorer life outcomes than residents of white neighborhoods in terms of income, housing equity, educational attainment, and life expectancy, a report from the Othering & Belonging Institute (formerly the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society) at the University of California, Berkeley finds. The fourth installment of Racial Segregation in the San Francisco Bay Area, the report, The Harmful Effects of Segregation, analyzed 2015 outcomes data for adults from highly segregated African-American and/or Latinx neighborhoods, highly segregated white neighborhoods, and relatively integrated neighborhoods compared to the level of segregation they experienced as children in 1990. According to the report, the median household income in highly segregated communities of color was $27,000 less per year ($48,843 vs. $$75,960) and home values were $131,000 less ($440,620 vs. $$572,168) than they were in low-segregation neighborhoods, while residents of highly segregated African-American and Latinx neighborhoods had less than half the average household income ($48,843 vs. $123,701) — despite similar labor participation rates — than did residents of white neighborhoods. The report also found that adults in highly segregated African-American and Latinx neighborhoods are only 25 percent as likely to have bachelors' degrees as adults in white neighborhoods, while fourth-graders in the former are less than half as likely to be "proficient" in math and reading and life expectancy is more than five years less (79 years vs. 84 years).

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