State University No More: Out-of-State Enrollment and the Growing Exclusion of High-Achieving, Low-Income Students at Public Flagship Universities

State University No More: Out-of-State Enrollment and the Growing Exclusion of High-Achieving, Low-Income Students at Public Flagship Universities

Cuts in state funding for public flagship universities are forcing many schools to admit more out-of-state students who pay higher tuition — to the point of shutting out moderate- and low-income in-state students, a report from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation finds. The report, State University No More: Out-of-State Enrollment and the Growing Exclusion of High-Achieving, Low-Income Students at Public Flagship Universities (24 pages, PDF), examined data from ninety-two public universities and found that in 2014-15, out-of-state students accounted for more than half of the freshman class in eleven and more than 40 percent in twenty-four of those universities. The study also found that a 10 percent cut in state funding for public research universities was associated with a 5 percent increase in the enrollment of out-of-state students; that average in-state tuition and fees at public research universities doubled between 2000 and 2016; and that, on average, in-state students from households earning less than $30,000 a year paid $10,500 in out of pocket costs in 2014-15. According to the report, some academically accomplished in-state students are being kept out of state universities because financial aid has not kept pace with tuition hikes, even as less accomplished out-of-state students whose families can afford the higher tuition are being admitted.