The Cost of Segregation

The Cost of Segregation

While the degree of racial/ethnic and economic segregation in Chicago is expected to decline between 2015 and 2030 — in part as a result of the growth of the city's Latinx, Asian-American, and multiracial populations — segregation in the region will remain high, a report from the Urban Institute finds. The report, The Cost of Segregation: Population and Household Projects in the Chicago Commuting Zone and Implications for Economic and Racial Segregation, 2015-30 (46 pages, PDF), estimates that Latinx-white segregation in the city will persist, and that while black-white segregation will decline, it will continue to be elevated. In addition, the report projects that the city and surrounding counties will see a resurgence in population growth between 2013 and 2030. Funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Chicago Community Trust through the Metropolitan Planning Council, the study also found that, unlike many other U.S. metropolitan areas, Chicago saw a steady decline in economic segregation between 1990 and 2010 and that, despite rising income inequality in the region, the level of segregation will continue to fall through 2030.