The State of Black Children

The State of Black Children

Young African Americans continue to grow up in communities afflicted by economic isolation, unemployment, violence and drugs, failing schools, fractured families, and racial injustices, including a biased criminal justice system, a report commissioned by the Children's Defense Fund for its Black Community Crusade for Children finds. Based on surveys and focus groups conducted by Hart Research Associates, The State of Black Children & Families (25 pages, PDF) looks at how African-American adults, caregivers, leaders, and youth view the challenges confronting black children in the twenty-first century, compared with respondents in a similar study in 1994. According to the report, adults and caregivers see little progress for middle-class and low-income children, with disproportionately high unemployment and incarceration rates among their top concerns. Nonetheless, most adults are guardedly optimistic, and youth are more optimistic than their elders. And when all respondents were asked which group could do the most to positively influence African-American youth, parents were the clear choice.