U.S. Health Care From a Global Perspective, 2019: Higher Spending, Worse Outcomes?

U.S. Health Care From a Global Perspective, 2019: Higher Spending, Worse Outcomes?

Healthcare spending in the U.S. in 2018 totaled 16.9 percent of GDP, nearly twice the 8.8 percent average among all Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, an analysis by the Commonwealth Fund finds. Based on data from the U.S. and ten other high-income OECD countries, the report, U.S. Health Care From a Global Perspective, 2019: Higher Spending, Worse Outcomes? (HTML or PDF, 19 pages), found that despite spending the most on health care per capita and as a share of GDP among the eleven nations, the U.S. had the lowest life expectancy and cervical cancer survival rate; the highest rates of suicide, obesity, chronic disease burden, and preventable deaths; and the second highest rate of hospitalization from preventable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. At the same time, the U.S. had the second highest rate of preventive measures such as rates of flu vaccination and breast cancer screenings for older adults and the highest rate of breast cancer survival. The report also notes that the U.S. had the fewest physicians per thousand people and that while per-capita public spending on health care was similar to that in the other ten countries, private and out-of-pocket spending were significantly higher.