U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows

For decades, the United States accepted and resettled more refugees as the number of people displaced by conflict, violence, or persecution worldwide increased, but in recent years that number has not kept pace with the surge in the global refugee population, a report from the Pew Research Center finds. Based on an analysis of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and U.S. State Department data, the report, U.S. Resettles Fewer Refugees, Even as Global Number of Displaced People Grows (39 pages, PDF), found that between 1982 and 2016, the U.S. resettled, on average, about 0.6 percent of the world's total refugee population each year. But while the worldwide refugee population has grown nearly 50 percent since 2013, the U.S. is on track in 2017 to resettle only 0.2 percent of the estimated 17.2 million refugees worldwide. The report also found that between 2002 and 2017, 55 percent of refugees entering the U.S. came from Burma (Myanmar), Iraq, Somalia, or Bhutan; that the share of those fleeing Middle Eastern and African countries has increased from 17 percent in 2002 to 68 percent in 2017; and that more Christian than Muslim refugees were admitted.