Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural America

Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural America

Rural Americans are more hesitant than their urban and suburban counterparts to be vaccinated against COVID-19, an issue brief from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds. Based on the KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor survey, the brief, Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural America, found that only 31 percent of respondents living in rural areas said they would "definitely get" the vaccine (compared with 42 percent and 43 percent of those in urban and suburban areas), with 29 percent saying they would do so as soon as they could (compared with 36 percent and 34 percent in urban and suburban areas) and one in five (20 percent) saying they would "definitely not get it" (compared with 15 percent of both urban and suburban residents). According to the survey,  respondents in rural areas also were more likely than urban and suburban respondents to say that they were "not worried that they or a family member would get sick from COVID-19" (39 percent vs. 23 percent and 30 percent), that "the seriousness of the coronavirus was generally exaggerated in the media" (50 percent vs. 27 percent and 37 percent), and that "getting vaccinated is mostly a personal choice" (61 percent vs. 41 percent and 50 percent).

(Photo credit: GAVI)

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