Veterans in the Workplace: Understanding the Challenges and Creating Long-Term Opportunities for Veteran Employers

Veterans in the Workplace: Understanding the Challenges and Creating Long-Term Opportunities for Veteran Employers

While military veterans are among the top three recruiting target groups for private firms, a civilian-military divide in the workplace remains, a report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation finds. Based on a survey of four hundred human-resource professionals and a thousand veterans who left active duty in the last five years, including some who participated in the foundation's Hiring Our Heroes program, the report, Veterans in the Workplace: Understanding the Challenges and Creating Long-Term Opportunities for Veteran Employers (20 pages, PDF), found that American businesses have made great strides in their recruitment of veterans. Of the surveyed HR professionals, 77 percent saw veterans as an important recruiting priority and viewed them as disciplined (86 percent), punctual (77 percent), and as team players (67 percent). At the same time, the survey found that 54 percent of respondents said their familiarity with the military was low; only 16 percent provided specialized onboarding assistance to veterans; and only 9 percent provided training to help their civilian employees relate to veterans. And while 71 percent of HR professionals said their workplaces were free of bias toward veterans, only 44 percent of veteran who responded to the survey said the same. Funded in part by the Merck Foundation, the study also found that 44 percent of the veterans surveyed reported leaving their first civilian job within a year.