Vulnerability Indicators and At-Risk Smaller Populations in California and Los Angeles

Vulnerability Indicators and At-Risk Smaller Populations in California and Los Angeles

About one in three Native Americans and one in five Pacific Islanders in California live in neighborhoods considered "highly vulnerable" to adverse health outcomes, a report from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research finds. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the report, Vulnerability Indicators and At-Risk Smaller Populations in California and Los Angeles: American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and Select Asian Ethnic Groups (15 pages, PDF), examined the number of American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and select Asian American ethnic subgroups considered to live in "highly vulnerable" neighborhoods based on four indicators of poverty and health, including the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. The study found that while Latinx and African Americans comprise the majority of residents in those neighborhoods — in which a quarter of all Californians live — between 27 percent and 36 percent (depending on indicator) of American Indians and between 18 percent and 23 percent of Pacific Islanders also live in such neighborhoods. Such neighborhoods are also home to between 29 percent and 45 percent of Cambodians living in the state — and that that group, along with American Indians, Pacific Islanders, Filipinos, and Koreans, has higher than average rates of COVID infections or deaths, or both.  

(Photo credit: GettyImages)

Featured connections