Women of Color: A Collective Powerhouse in the U.S. Electorate

Women of Color: A Collective Powerhouse in the U.S. Electorate

Although the number of women of color who are eligible to vote in U.S. elections grew six times faster than the number of white women eligible to vote over the past decade, insufficient data collection, apathy on the part of lawmakers, and voter suppression efforts could undermine those gains while perpetuating racial and gender disparities, a report from the Center for American Progress finds. The report, Women of Color: A Collective Powerhouse in the U.S. Electorate, found that the population of eligible African-American women increased some 31 percent between 2000 and 2017, and while only 66 percent voted in 2016, down from 74 percent in 2012 and 75 percent in 2008, turnout in the 2018 midterm elections surged 16 percentage points over previous midterms, while the voting-age citizen population of Latinas, Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander women, and American Indian and Alaska Native women increased 89 percent, 97 percent, and 29 percent, respectively. According to the report, women have a range of views on policy questions with respect to the economy and jobs, health care, immigration, public safety, and discrimination; to ensure that their perspectives are reflected in policy decisions, the report calls for collecting comprehensive, disaggregated data on women of color, combating voter suppression, and pursuing comprehensive and responsive policy reforms.

(Photo credit: Getty/Elijah Nouvelage)