Atlantic Philanthropies Awards $197 Million for Global Fellows Program

Atlantic Philanthropies Awards $197 Million for Global Fellows Program

Atlantic Philanthropies has announced two grants totaling $197 million in support of efforts to equip innovative leaders with the resources necessary to address inequality and enhance opportunity in their own communities and on a global scale.

A grant of $91 million (£64.4 million) over twenty years to the London School of Economics and Political Science will establish an Atlantic Fellows program at LSE's International Inequalities Institute. The latest addition to an interconnected set of fellowship programs designed to address critical global challenges, the program will support researchers, teachers, health professionals, activists, scholars, entrepreneurs, artists, writers, government officials, and others working to improve health, equity, and opportunity and remove barriers to inclusion. Among other things, the program will offer residencies, seminars, mentoring programs, practical project work, and networking relationships and will collaborate with a variety of partners, including Cornell University and the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

A second grant of $106 million (£75 million) over fifteen years will establish the Atlantic Institute at Oxford University, which will serve as a knowledge-sharing hub for Atlantic Fellows. To be run by the Rhodes Trust, the institute will work to foster collaboration among fellows to maximize their impact locally and globally and provide support them throughout their careers. Activities will include global convenings design to connect current participants and alumni across programs, as well as annual innovation prizes.

In the coming months, Atlantic plans to announce additional fellows programs in what it expects will be a network of programs and institutions representing a $600 million investment over two decades — the largest in the foundaton's thirty-five-year history. Previously announced investments include $40 million in support of a twenty-year fellowship initiative that seeks to reduce disparities in health access and quality of care in Southeast Asia and a $177 million grant for an Atlantic Fellows program at the Global Brain Health Institute, a joint venture of the University of California, San Francisco and Trinity College Dublin to improve the practice of dementia care.

"From its inception, Atlantic has invested in people and in their vision and ability to realize a better world," said Atlantic Philanthropies president and CEO Christopher G. Oechsli. "In our final year of grantmaking, we are making our largest philanthropic investment ever, in people. Our vision for the Atlantic Fellows programs is to connect and empower a new generation of people who are committed to working together across disciplines and borders to advance fairer, healthier, and more inclusive societies."