Blood Cancer Discoveries collaboration awards $6.75 million

Blood Cancer Discoveries collaboration awards $6.75 million

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the Mark Foundation for Cancer Research, and the Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group have announced grants totaling $6.75 million in support of innovative blood cancer research.

Through the Blood Cancer Discoveries Grant Program, a collaboration of the three funders that supports research with the potential to identify novel approaches to the treatment of leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma, and myelodysplastic syndromes, grants of $750,000 over three years were awarded to nine researchers seeking to understand the biological underpinnings of blood cancers, and what causes them to develop, grow, and/or become resistant to treatment. Recipients include Catriona Jamieson (University of California San Diego), who is researching two enzymes (APOBEC3 and ADAR1) known to cause mutations in DNA and RNA and evaluating their role in AML and disease relapse, particularly in elderly patients; Susan Schwab (New York University), who is exploring the mechanism of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells that allows the cells to enter and accumulate in the central nervous system after the disease has spread to the brain; Margaret Shipp (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School), who is mapping the immune microenvironment in classical Hodgkin lymphoma; and Daniel T. Starczynowski (Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation), who is researching the role and potential therapeutic benefit of targeting of a protein called UBE2N in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

"In science, collaboration can accelerate the pace of achievement," said Mark Foundation CEO Michele Cleary. "Similarly, this three-way partnership among foundations will accelerate our understanding of cancer biology by empowering some of the brightest scientists to simultaneously probe unique but challenging areas of unmet need. We look forward to the discoveries that will result from these efforts."