Carnegie Awards $5 Million for Academic, International Policy Programs

Carnegie Awards $5 Million for Academic, International Policy Programs

The Carnegie Corporation of New York has announced five grants totaling $5 million in support of projects aimed at improving the transfer of global affairs research and expertise from academia to the policy world.

Part of Carnegie's Rigor and Relevance Initiative, the grants of $1 million each were awarded through a competitive program that challenged the twenty-two U.S.-based members of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs to address ongoing concerns over the gap between the scholarly work of academics and the needs of policy makers who deal with the same complex international issues. An important objective of the grants is to encourage universities to address tenure rules that widen the gap by not recognizing policy research and articles written for non-academic publications or as part of assignments outside the university. Recipients also will be expected to find ways to connect policy makers and practitioners with their respective universities, either in person or virtually, on specific issues of international importance.

Grant recipients include Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs ("Launching a global hub for research and consultation on cyber policy"); Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs ("Creating a multi-institutional consortium and network of policy-relevant scholars"); Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy ("Developing strategies for enhancing legitimacy in fragile states"); the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies ("Researching the peacebuilding role of non-violent, non-state actors"); and the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies ("Targeting urgent international security issues through collaboration").

"There is a widely held belief that academic research is becoming increasingly less relevant to policy makers and, more broadly, to public debate on a dizzying array of global developments," said Stephen Del Rosso, director of the foundation’s International Peace and Security program. "These grants represent our largest targeted investment to date in support of our longstanding interest in bridging the research-policy gap."