College Board Launches $25 Million Scholarship Program

College Board Launches $25 Million Scholarship Program

The College Board, a nonprofit membership association dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education, has announced the launch of a national scholarship program designed to help guide high school students through the college planning process. 

To that end, the organization will dedicate $25 million over five years to the College Board Opportunity Scholarships program, which lays out six key steps in the college application process and gives high school students a chance to win money in monthly drawings tied to each step. The steps include successfully building a college list (six hundred awards of $500 each); studying for the SATs using Khan Academy's Official SAT Practice resource (fifteen hundred awards of $1,000 each); improving one's SAT scores through practice (a hundred and fifty awards of $2,000 each); refining one's college list to ensure a mix of academic safety, fit, and reach (four hundred awards of $500 each); completing the FAFSA, the free government form that helps students and families determine their eligibility for financial aid (eight hundred awards of $1,000 each); and applying to a college or colleges he or she would like to attend (five hundred awards of $1,000 each). Students who complete all six steps will be eligible for a drawing for twenty-five scholarships worth $40,000 each.

To be launched in December for the class of 2020, the program is open to all students who attend high school in the United States, Puerto Rico, or a U.S. territory. The College Board is designating half the scholarships for students whose families earn $60,000 a year or less.

"We hear from students and families everywhere that getting into college is too complicated and overwhelming. They are hungry for a simple guide," said College Board CEO David Coleman. "The new College Board Opportunity Scholarships program clarifies the path to college and encourages all students to stay on it. All students can earn one of these scholarships, even students who never dreamt they could."