DDCF awards $4.5 million for Native communities across United States

DDCF awards $4.5 million for Native communities across United States

The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation has announced grants totaling more than $4.5 million to support health and well-being, cultural preservation, and social welfare in Native communities across the United States.

Native-led and -centered recipients of the grants include Parents And Children Together in Honolulu, which was awarded $1.2 million over four years in support of its multigenerational, family-centered programming and services; Anchorage-based Covenant House Alaska, which will receive $1 million over three years to increase access to and use of various health and human services by homeless youth; and the Standing Rock Community Development Corporation in Fort Yates, North Dakota, which was awarded $750,000 over three years to implement youth and community development, language and culture, and food sovereignty strategies.

Other grants announced by the foundation include $700,000 over three years to the National Indian Child Welfare Association in Portland, Oregon, in support of a pilot study of the Positive Indian Parenting program; $500,000 over twenty-eight months to the First Peoples Fund in Rapid City, South Dakota, for the first phase of a national field scan of the Native performing arts community; $300,000 over two years to the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries and Museums in Oklahoma City in support of an initiative to increase access to and the use of the Doris Duke Native American Oral History collection at universities across the country; and $100,000 over three months to Tulsa-based IllumiNative in support of efforts to raise awareness of the impacts of COVID-19 in Native communities.

"We are thrilled to support these Native leaders' efforts to respond to the unique needs of Native peoples in culturally appropriate ways that preserve, build on, and amplify the visibility of the rich assets of their communities," said Lola Adedokun, DDCF's program director for child well-being. "These grantees are passionate about and well-poised to take on the lasting inequities and wounds inflicted by colonization, to revitalize cultural connections, to bolster health and well-being, and to broaden the exposure of the larger U.S. population to accurate depictions of Native American history and cultures. We look forward to observing and learning from these partners in this crucial work."