Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Awards $10.5 Million for Medical Research

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Awards $10.5 Million for Medical Research

The New York City-based Doris Duke Charitable Foundation has awarded a total of $10.5 million to seven mid-career physician-scientists to support their clinical research efforts in the areas of cancer, AIDS, and cardiovascular disease.

The winners of the third annual competition for the Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award will each receive $1.5 million to be used over the next five to seven years to support research that seeks to use the latest scientific advances as ways to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure certain diseases. The only requirement of the cash awards, which are disbursed in full to allow for greater flexibility, is that the recipient must use approximately one-third of the award to mentor junior clinical researchers and encourage cross-disciplinary research. All nonprofit medical institutions in the United States were invited to nominate scientists in the four disease areas of cancer, AIDS, blood disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.

Brian J. Druker, M.D., of the Oregon Health & Science Center; Charles L. Sawyers, M.D., of the UCLA School of Medicine; and Margaret A. Shipp, M.D., of the Harvard University Dana-Farber Cancer Institute were selected in the cancer research category. Nina Bhardwaj, M.D., of Rockefeller University and Robert F. Siliciano, M.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine were selected for AIDS research, and Steven A.N. Goldstein, M.A., Ph.D., M.D. of Yale University School of Medicine and Dianna M. Milewicz, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston were selected for cardiovascular disease research.

"We are pleased to be able to support these seven physician-scientists," said Joan E. Spero, president of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. "They are individuals who are not only outstanding scientists, but physicians who are devoted to translating today's basic scientific breakthroughs into new treatments and cures for human diseases."