Fourth class of Harvard City Leadership Initiative announced

Fourth class of Harvard City Leadership Initiative announced

The Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative, a collaboration between Bloomberg Philanthropies,  Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Business School, has announced a fourth class of mayors for the executive training program. 

Mayors participating in the program attend immersive online classes taught by Harvard faculty and experts from Bloomberg Philanthropies' global network designed to equip them with  tools and expertise they can use to more effectively lead their cities. With mayors expected to play a central role in driving the social and economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis, this year's program will focus on the skills needed to respond to emerging challenges, with an emphasis on equity, and will include additional supports such as coaching on the use of data to address the economic impacts of the pandemic, workshops focused on public communication, and peer-to-peer learning opportunities.

This year's class of forty includes seventeen women, fourteen African-American and Latinx mayors, sixteen mayors in their first year in office, and twenty-one mayors leading  cities with a population under a hundred thousand. Participants include Scott Singer (Boca Raton, Florida); Lauren McLean (Boise, Idaho); Chris Mehl (Bozeman, Montana); Miro Weinberger (Burlington, Vermont); Deborah Feinen (Champaign, Illinois); Luke Feeney (Chillicothe, Ohio); Aja Brown (Compton, California); Katrina Foley (Costa Mesa, California); Monique Owens (Eastpointe, Michigan); Frank Whitfield (Elyria, Ohio); Sheldon Neeley (Flint, Michigan); Indya Kincannon (Knoxville, Tennessee); Frank Scott (Little Rock, Arkansas); Steven Reed (Montgomery, Alabama); Shawyn Patterson-Howard (Mount Vernon, New York); Steve Chirico (Naperville, Illinois); James Donchess (Nashua, New Hampshire); Alejandra Sotelo-Solis (National City, California); Justin Elicker (New Haven, Connecticut); Breea Clark (Norman, Oklahoma); Christine Hunschofsky (Parkland, Florida); Thurman Bartie (Port Arthur, Texas); Mary-Ann Baldwin (Raleigh, North Carolina); Darrell Steinberg (Sacramento, California); Kimberley Driscoll (Salem, Massachusetts); Erin Mendenhall (Salt Lake City, Utah); Joe Goethals (San Mateo, California); Van Johnson (Savannah, Georgia); Paige Cognetti (Scranton, Pennsylvania); Joseph Curtatone (Somerville, Massachusetts); James Mueller (South Bend, Indiana); Nadine Woodward (Spokane, Washington); James Langfelder (Springfield, Illinois); David Martin (Stamford, Connecticut); Lori Wilson (Suisun City, California); Carol Dutra-Vernaci (Union City, California); Keith James (West Palm Beach, Florida); Christopher Cabaldon (West Sacramento, California); Brandon Whipple (Wichita, Kansas); and Tito Brown (Youngstown, Ohio).

"We launched this program four years ago because mayors have the power to make the biggest changes in America — and with cities leading the way in confronting the COVID-19 pandemic, their jobs have never been more important," said Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies and a former three-term mayor of New York City. "This year's class was chosen because they all believe in finding creative solutions to improve people's lives, and we're looking forward to helping them and their teams respond to this crisis — and make their cities stronger, better, and more equitable for years to come."