Google.org awards $10 million for digital skills workforce development

Google.org awards $10 million for digital skills workforce development

Google.org has announced grants totaling $10 million to the YWCA USAJFF, and NPower in support of digital skills and workforce development programs.

The grants will support efforts by nonprofits and workforce development boards to strengthen job training programs and increase access to digital skills training for underserved populations, including women and veterans. The YWCA received $5 million in support of programming designed to reach ten thousand women over the next three years, including the scale-up of two workforce developing programs focused on providing digital skills training for women and people of color — the YWeb Career Academy, which was created by the YWCA Madison in Wisconsin, and STRIVE, which was developed by the YWCA McLean County in Indiana. 

In addition, JFF was awarded $4 million in support of the Outcomes for Opportunity Initiative, a two-year joint pilot program with Google.org aimed at increasing the availability, accessibility, aggregation, and analysis of data and information as a means of enabling workforce development boards and nonprofits to expand economic opportunity for workers. 

Google also announced the expansion of the IT Certificate Employer Consortium and three new Google Career Certificates (in Data Analytics, Project Management, and User Experience [UX] Design), a hundred thousand need-based scholarships for individuals hoping to earn a Google certificate, and a range of efforts to incorporate the certificate programs in high schools across America. 

"YWCA is thrilled to partner with Google.org as we work to create innovative approaches to workforce development and forge new ways to bring the future of work and skills development to women and communities of color across the country," said YWCA USA chief executive Alejandra Y. Castillo. "The greater goal of the partnership surpasses well beyond the scope of the grant. We are breaking down barriers and creating a path to success for women and people of color that may not have been available without these new programs and initiatives."

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