Hilton Announces $25.5 Million in Grants, New Foster Youth Strategy

Hilton Announces $25.5 Million in Grants, New Foster Youth Strategy

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation has announced second-quarter grants totaling $25.5 million.

The awards include thirty-one grants in support of initiatives in the areas of foster youth, children affected by HIV and AIDS, safe water, homelessness, substance use prevention, Catholic sisters, and multiple sclerosis. Under a new five-year strategy, the foundation's Foster Youth Strategic Initiative will focus on helping all foster youth transitioning out of the system in Los Angeles and New York City to become thriving, self-sufficient adults through efforts to strengthen foster care systems and policies, the expansion of knowledge sharing within the field, and support for innovative programs. To that end, the foundation awarded a grant of $720,000 to Graham-Windham for a program aimed at improving college and career pathways for foster youth in New York City, and a grant of $825,000 to the Children's Data Network at the University of Southern California Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work in support of its efforts to link key child welfare and health indicators for older foster youth in Los Angeles.

Other grants announced by the foundation include $8.2 million to Seattle-based PATH in support of its plan to scale early-childhood development services in Mozambique, Kenya, and Zambia; $2.5 million to the Aquaya Institute to explore and build sustainable water quality testing systems in Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Uganda; and $400,000 to LA Voice to engage faith leaders across Los Angeles County in ending homelessness and reducing displacement and housing insecurity.

In addition, the foundation awarded $1.8 million to the University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation to adapt Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) as part of a student wellness community; $840,000 to Sisters of Mercy of the Americas in support of its programs and organizational capacity building activities; and Marilyn Hilton Award for Innovation in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research grants totaling $3.78 million to seventeen researchers.