Knight Arts Challenge Detroit Awards Nearly $2.15 Million

Knight Arts Challenge Detroit Awards Nearly $2.15 Million

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has announced awards totaling nearly $2.15 million to forty-five projects through the 2016 Knight Arts Challenge Detroit.

The winners include Alicia Diaz, who will receive a grant of $79,359 for "Dangerous Times, Dangerous Responses," a multimedia exhibition that examines Detroit's role as a sanctuary for Central American refugees in the 1980s; A Host of People, which was awarded $25,000 for "The Other Hand," an experimental play and performance series that will explore the in-between spaces of those who hold multiple identities of race, culture, gender, and sexuality; Wire-Car Auto Workers Association of Detroit, which will receive a grant of $7,300 to promote wire-car culture through an interactive website that serves as a resource for wire-car makers and enthusiasts; Emily Kutil, who will receive $15,000 for "Black Bottom Street View," a project that connects Detroit residents with the Burton Historic Collection's photographs of the former Black Bottom neighborhood through a website that serves as a platform for neighborhood histories; and Essay'd, which was awarded $30,000 to promote critical discourse on the arts in Detroit through a series of activities, including peer-reviewed essays on Detroit artists, public workshops, and artist talks.

Other winners include Focus: HOPE, which was awarded a grant of $164,750 for "How Ma Bell Got Her Groove Back: Detroit for Real," a project that will transform the historic Michigan Bell Telephone building into a canvas for Detroit stories by projecting onto it new works of light art, video, and photographs; Kristi Faulkner Dance, which will receive a grant of $30,000 for "Not In My House: A Performance Celebrating LGBT Identity"; and The Hinterlands, which was awarded a grant of $70,000 for "The Enemy of My Enemy," a multimedia project that will explore external narratives and perceptions of the United States through the eyes of artists from China, Russia, and Iran.

"These ideas tell Detroit stories in homegrown, authentic voices," said Knight Foundation arts program officer Adam Ganuza. "They transform public spaces. They explore the various histories of the city and how, for better or worse, those legacies continue to shape the lives of residents."

"Meet the Winning Ideas in Detroit’s Knight Arts Challenge." John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Press Release 11/03/2016.