NY Life Foundation Awards $2.5 Million for Childhood Grief Programs

The New York Life Foundation has announced grants totaling $2.5 million in support of childhood bereavement programs.

A $1.5 million grant over three years to the Moyer Foundation will support an expansion of its grief support program, with the goal of reaching more than nine thousand children and teens in fifty locations in the United States and Canada. Created in 2002, the Moyer Foundation's Camp Erin program combines traditional camp activities with grief education and emotional support for grieving children and teens at no cost to their families. The grant from New York Life will provide support for programmatic expansion at existing and five new camp locations, awareness-raising efforts, training for New York Life staff in helping clients cope with their loss, and the development of systems to evaluate the program's effectiveness and impact.

"We are proud to continue our partnership with the Moyer Foundation to expand Camp Erin's reach to help more bereaved youth," said New York Life Foundation vice president Maria Collins. "Since the inception of our partnership in 2008, over eighteen thousand grieving children have been served, and we are pleased that more grieving children and families will get the resources they need. Our partnership goes beyond providing financial support; more than half of the forty-five local Camp Erin partners are engaged with New York Life offices around the country."

In addition, a $1 million grant over two years to Judi's House/JAG Institute will support the efforts of that organization's Comprehensive Grief Care Research Initiative to develop an accurate, first-of-its-kind measure of the number of children who are affected by death in a geographic region, as well as tools for assessing children's cognitive, behavioral, academic, and interpersonal adjustment over time after experiencing a significant death. The foundation also will work with the organization to upgrade, digitize, and streamline its current information systems and processes so as to disseminate its findings more widely.

"We are supporting Judi's House/JAG Institute because there is a clear need to develop standard and reliable measures and assessments for supporting bereaved children and their families as well as the broader field," said Collins. "The organization's work will provide tools for other service providers to systematically evaluate the impact of their service programs and enhance the success of interventions designed to increase resilience and well-being."