Rockefeller Foundation, BSR Launch Impact Sourcing Coalition

Rockefeller Foundation, BSR Launch Impact Sourcing Coalition

The Rockefeller Foundation, in collaboration with BSR, a global nonprofit that works to build a more just and sustainable world, has announced the launch of an initiative aimed at building more inclusive global supply chains.

The Global Impact Sourcing Coalition (GISC) will work to promote impact sourcing — the intentional hiring, training, and provision of career development opportunities to youth who would otherwise have limited prospects for formal employment — as a strategy to reduce youth unemployment and support inclusive economic development in developing countries while providing tangible benefits to business. Founding members of GISC include global performance management company Nielsen and mobile communications company Vodacom

GISC was developed after Rockefeller saw a need to broaden awareness and understanding of impact sourcing as a result of its work on the Digital Jobs Africa initiative, which was launched in 2013 to catalyze new sustainable employment opportunities and skills training for African youth. According to the foundation, youth who obtain jobs and training through impact sourcing see their income as much as triple, learn transferable skills that can lead to career advancement, and help lift their families and communities out of poverty. In addition, local businesses benefit from lower attrition rates, higher levels of employee motivation, access to new sources of talent, and corporate social responsibility and diversity at a cost comparable to or lower than traditional business process outsourcing.

"The Rockefeller Foundation has a long history of working to build inclusive economies by knocking down barriers to opportunity," said Mamadou Biteye, the foundation’s managing director for Africa. "Today, I am pleased to debut the Global Impact Sourcing Coalition and witness leading companies coming together to commit to scaling Impact Sourcing globally. Working with the private sector — which provides nine out of every ten jobs in the world — to build inclusive supply chains has the potential to change many lives in Africa and beyond."