September 11 Fund Encouraging Donors to Redirect Contributions to Other Charities

September 11 Fund Encouraging Donors to Redirect Contributions to Other Charities

The New York Community Trust and United Way of New York City, the two organizations that established the September 11th Fund to assist victims of the terrorist attacks against the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., have asked donors to redirect their contributions to other charities, citing long-standing community needs, many of which have been exacerbated by the attacks.

Managers of the Fund — which has collected more than $425 million in donations and made grants of more than $160 million — believe that its current resources, combined with those of the American Red Cross, other charities, and local, state and federal government agencies, will be enough to accomplish its goals. As a result, the Fund is encouraging donors to redirect their future charitable contributions to nonprofits working in local communities, across the country, and internationally.

More than ninety percent of the $160 million disbursed by the Fund to date has been used to provide cash assistance and services for 27,717 victims and families in fifty states and twenty countries, while the remainder has gone to rescue and recovery efforts or been used to provide grants and loans to rebuild communities. Going forward, the Fund, in coordination with other organizations, will work to ensure that the needs of victims, families, and communities affected by the attacks are met.

"We are extraordinarily grateful to the individuals, corporations, and foundations who have contributed their money to help in the recovery efforts," said Franklin Thomas, chairman of the September 11th Fund's board. "With the federal government's Victims' Compensation Fund and charities coordinating their responses to families, the Fund can now concentrate on effectively distributing the $270 million remaining to meet longer-term needs of affected individuals, families and communities."