UF Receives $12 Million for Brain Tumor Research Initiative

UF Receives $12 Million for Brain Tumor Research Initiative

The University of Florida and UF Health have announced a $12 million gift from Orlando hotel magnate Harris Rosen and the Harris Rosen Foundation to advance innovative brain tumor research and launch a partnership focused on the development of novel brain tumor treatments.

Announced at the inaugural ReMission Summit for Brain Tumors in Orlando, the lead gift in a $100 million fundraising campaign will support the ReMission Alliance Against Brain Tumors, a multi-institution collaborative led by UF that is working to advance brain tumor research. The alliance's work will build on the success and growth of UF's Preston A. Wells Jr. Center for Brain Tumor Therapy and collaborative research partnerships fostered over several years by its co-director, Duane Mitchell, MD, PhD, and his colleagues. Over the past five years, the center has experienced dramatic growth and established itself as a leader for brain tumor treatment and research. Along with William Friedman, MD, co-director of the Preston A. Wells Jr. Center, Mitchell and his team will support several bold research projects and clinical trials coordinated with principal partners from among the world's best research institutes and hospitals.  

Rosen is the founder, president, and chief operating officer of Rosen Hotels & Resorts. His son, Adam, who died in November after a prolonged battle with brain cancer, had been treated at UF Health. In recognition of the gift, the suite that houses the UF Health Neuromedicine practice at the UF Health Neuromedicine Hospital and the neuro-oncology laboratories in the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute will be named after Adam Rosen. 

"The team at UF is already doing extraordinary work, and the alliance will enhance their progress and improve outcomes for patients well beyond Florida," said Rosen. "A collaboration like this is difficult and lofty, but my family and I support this vision to rewrite the story of brain cancer."