University of Kentucky College of Law Receives $20 Million Gift

University of Kentucky College of Law Receives $20 Million Gift

The University of Kentucky has announced a $20 million gift to its College of Law from alumnus J. David Rosenberg (JD '73) and his wife, Dianne.

The gift, the third largest in the university's history, will create an endowment, the Rosenberg College of Law Endowment, in support of an annual merit scholarship for a law school student; a faculty position to be selected by the school's dean in consultation with other faculty members; and a range of programming, including symposia, visiting professors, and student career services.

In recognition of the gift, the college — which was founded in 1908 as one of the  first state law schools in the U.S. — will be renamed the J. David Rosenberg College of Law. A senior partner in the Cincinnati firm of Keating, Muething & Klekamp, where he has practiced since 1974, Rosenberg has served in volunteer leadership roles at several organizations, including the University of Kentucky College of Law Visiting Committee, the Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati, and the Greater Cincinnati Foundation. Recently, the Rosenbergs provided support for an original opera based on Blind Injustice, a book by Mark Godsey, co-founder of the Ohio Innocence Project, a program affiliated with the University of Cincinnati College of Law that has helped exonerate and secure the release of nearly thirty wrongly convicted and incarcerated individuals.

"There is a saying that 'education is an unfinished symphony,'" said Rosenberg. "We make music to stir hearts and minds, to force us to remember, and compel us to commit to each other and to ideas larger than ourselves. We invest in education — to honor those upon whose shoulders we stand who made our success possible, but also as an investment of faith in the future, the idea that what these students will compose and create as lawyers and leaders — ideas, laws, and public policy — will deepen not only our understanding of the law, but how our society can be more just."