V Foundation Announces $8 Million for Minority Cancer Research

V Foundation Announces $8 Million for Minority Cancer Research

The V Foundation for Cancer Research in Cary, North Carolina, has announced gifts totaling nearly $8 million through the Stuart Scott Memorial Cancer Research Fund.

Launched in 2015 in honor of Scott, an ESPN anchor who succumbed to cancer, the fund supports projects aimed at boosting treatment options, therapeutic responsiveness, and overall outcomes for minority populations affected by the disease, as well as research projects driven by minority investigators. According to the foundation, certain cancers are more common among members of racial minorities; in his last year, Scott was particularly focused on improving outcomes for African Americans and other minorities disproportionately affected by the disease.

Recipients include Yanis Boumber, an assistant professor in the Department of Hematology/Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, who was awarded a translational grant of $600,000 over three years to explore the effectiveness of therapy combinations in improving survival rates and investigate tumor tissue and blood-based biomarkers for all lung cancer patients enrolled in an investigator-initiated multi-center immunotherapy study. Additional projects supported by the fund include research into the genomic predictors of aggressive and lethal prostate cancer in African-American men conducted by Jong Park at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida, and an investigation of the mutational structure of colorectal cancers in African Americans conducted by Sanford Markowitz at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

"[My sister] Sydni and I are very enthusiastic about the outcomes from the funds raised and grants given in honor of our dad. His fight has become our inspiration as we continue to see families all around us, just like ours, continuing to be traumatized by this disease," said Taelor Scott, Stuart Scott's daughter. "Through the hard work and guidance of the V Foundation and the dedication of researchers, we remain encouraged that healthcare disparities that disproportionately harm vulnerable communities will hold a spot of importance until we find a cure."