William T. Grant Foundation Announces 2020 Scholars Awards

William T. Grant Foundation Announces 2020 Scholars Awards

The William T. Grant Foundation in New York City has announced the recipients of its 2020 Scholars Awards.

Launched in 1982, the program recognizes promising social, behavioral, and health sciences researchers with awards of $350,000 over five years as well as mentorship opportunities, workshops, and annual retreats designed to introduce them to new disciplines, content areas, and methods.

This year's Grant Scholars are Manasi Deshpande (University of Chicago), who will use her award to investigate how expectations about the future availability of government benefits affect parental investment in children's education and skills; Terrance L. Green (University of Texas), who will examine the potential of local racial equity policies to address persistent and unequal educational outcomes of African-American students; Sarah Ketchen Lipson (Boston University), who will investigate the lived experiences of transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) college students and the impact of campus policies on TGNC suicidality across intersectional identities; Jayanti Owens (Brown University), who will investigate racial/ethnic differences in school discipline and the extent to which such gaps are shaped by the kinds of schools students attend, perceptions of how students of color behave, and the differences in sanctions and supports for students of color; and Valerie B. Shapiro (University of California, Berkeley), who will explore how research-brokering websites can better engage educators to improve the acquisition and use of research evidence.

"We are excited to welcome these outstanding early career researchers to the William T. Grant Scholars Program," said Grant Foundation senior vice president Vivian Tseng. "They are stretching their content and methodological expertise in new and exciting ways to address problems of inequality and improving the use of research evidence. Projects tackle racial inequality in schools, interrogating both racial equity policies and disciplinary practices; examine parental investment in the education of youth with disabilities transitioning out of special education; and explore the impact of campus policies on the mental health of transgender and gender nonconforming college students. This year we also awarded our first scholars grant on improving the use of research evidence, which considers the role of research-brokering websites. By supporting their research agendas and professional development, the William T. Grant Scholars Program seeks to contribute to a bright new generation of scholars who will bring rigorous research to youth policies, programs, and practices in the U.S."