Zuckerberg San Francisco General to Expand Literacy Campaign

Zuckerberg San Francisco General to Expand Literacy Campaign

Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital has announced that it will expand the Talking Is Teaching: Talk, Read, Sing early literacy campaign, a program of the Clinton Foundation's Too Small to Fail initiative, within the hospital.

The expanded campaign will work to ensure that the parents and caregivers of the approximately twelve hundred babies who are born at the hospital annually receive language-friendly Talking Is Teaching materials, which are designed to encourage quality interactions between parents and infants. In the first year of the partnership, Talking Is Teaching materials were provided directly by pediatricians to families of young children who received primary care at the Children's Health Center.

This year, as part of the campaign expansion to the hospital's labor and delivery unit, key hospital staff, including midwives, postpartum nurses, and physicians, will be trained to share information and tools with parents and caregivers about the critical role they play in their children's early brain and language development. Starting this month, each newborn and family discharged from the hospital will receive evidence-based materials, including books, tip sheets, and tote bags with prompts that encourage parents to engage in quality interactions with their children from birth through early childhood.

The announcement follows the release of a study which found that the campaign helped boost key early literacy skills in young children who received primary care at the hospital's outpatient pediatric clinic. Conducted by the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco, the study also found that when pediatricians relayed information and tools to parents and caregivers about the critical role they play, four out of five reported talking, reading, and singing more often with their children.

"We know that the path to lifelong learning and success starts early. Research clearly shows that parents and caregivers have an incredible opportunity to impact their young children's early brain development starting at birth," said Too Small to Fail CEO Patti Miller. "These new findings will reinforce our commitment to working with community partners to ensure parents have the resources to support their young children's success."