SSIR@PND

Through an agreement with the Stanford Social Innovation Review, PND is pleased to be able to offer a series of articles and profiles related to the "business" of improving society.

Renewing Philanthropy’s Commitment to Local Journalism

Renewing Philanthropy’s Commitment to Local Journalism

Julie Sandorf  |  November 26, 2019

The decline in local journalism is undermining our contributes and contributing to a national civic crisis, writes Sandorf, but philanthropy, in partnership with others, is taking steps to stem the tide....

Participant Media Creates Entertainment for Social Change

Participant Media Creates Entertainment for Social Change

Tracy E. Gilchrist  |  October 28, 2019

The media landscape has changed dramatically in the years since Jeff Skoll founded Participant Media, writes Gilchrist, but like other Silicon Valley success stories, the company has demonstrated a consistent ability to adapt.... 

Eight Myths of U.S. Philanthropy

Eight Myths of U.S. Philanthropy

Lilly Family School of Philanthropy  |  September 30, 2019

By examining the eight common myths of philanthropy — including who gives, how they give, and to what end — we can better comprehend the breadth and diversity of giving....

When White Philanthropy Funded Black Power

When White Philanthropy Funded Black Power

Marilyn Harris  |  August 30, 2019

Harris, a journalist, shares details of a working paper authored by Claire Dunning, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy, that examines a high-minded but "short-lived and largely forgotten" experiment aimed at improving race relations and the living standards of African Americans in 1970s Boston....

Creating New Pathways to Capital

Creating New Pathways to Capital

Alvin Warren, Robin Brulé  |  July 30, 2019

Lack of access to capital not only prevents business growth but also perpetuates cycles of intergenerational poverty and racial inequity that affect families and communities at all levels. Brulé and Warren report on one model that is helping to change that equation in New Mexico....

China’s New Model of Blockchain-Driven Philanthropy

China’s New Model of Blockchain-Driven Philanthropy

Kevin C. Desouza, Xiaofeng Wang  |  June 27, 2019

According to Wang and Desouza, social entrepreneurs in the world's most populous country are using blockchain technology to create a more decentralized and autonomous philanthropic sector....

How to Push DEI Conversations Out of the Comfort Zone

How to Push DEI Conversations Out of the Comfort Zone

Chera Reid, Jara Dean-Coffey  |  May 30, 2019

As we work to advance racial equity in philanthropy, write Reid and Dean-Coffey, four practices can help us find our "learning edge" — the boundary of our comfort zone and competencies where change is truly transformative and freeing....

Forest Restoration for Fuel

Forest Restoration for Fuel

James Gaines  |  April 29, 2019

Is commercial-scale torrefaction — the process of turning wood scraps from forest-thinning operations into a coal substitute — a partial solution to climate change? Gaines, a freelance science journalist living in Seattle, reports....

Communities Need Neighborhood Trusts

Communities Need Neighborhood Trusts

Joseph Margulies  |  March 29, 2019

Low-income communities need ownership over the resources that flow into them and defenses to protect them from feckless funders and footloose capital, argues Margulies. In an age when the failure of unregulated capitalism is becoming more evident every day, options like the neighborhood trust cannot be implemented quickly enough....

The Cost of Financial Precarity

The Cost of Financial Precarity

Carrie Leana  |  February 26, 2019

With wages stagnating, benefits shrinking, and personal debt increasing, financial precarity has become widespread in the United States, writes Leana, but the philanthropic community has been and can continue to be a catalyst for solutions to the problem.... 

The Power of Letting Go

The Power of Letting Go

Dan Honig  |  December 27, 2018

Honig looks at new research that explores when top-down control works best in international development work and when organizations should let employees in the field navigate challenges using their own judgment....

Time for a Three-Legged Measurement Stool

Time for a Three-Legged Measurement Stool

Fay Twersky  |  November 27, 2018

Across the social sector, writes Twersky, there is a growing recognition of the importance of being human centered — of putting the people we seek to benefit at the center of our problem-solving efforts....

When Rapid Equals Urgent

When Rapid Equals Urgent

Michael Seo  |  October 24, 2018

Movements such as #MeToo and Time's Up reinforce why a rapid-response fund might focus on women human rights defenders. Seo, the founder of ReaMedica and ReaMedica Health Care Kenya, reports on one such fund....

The #GivingTuesday Model

The #GivingTuesday Model

Asha Curran  |  September 25, 2018

Since its creation in 2012, #GivingTuesday has spread across the world, with official movements in forty-six countries and unofficial activity in dozens more. As Curran explains, there are important lessons all nonprofits can learn from its success....

A New Local Movement

A New Local Movement

Sarah Murray  |  August 28, 2018

Freelance journalist Sarah Murray looks at an innovative fund in Chicago that is demonstrating how place-based impact investing can transform a community....

A New Form of Capitalism

A New Form of Capitalism

Sarah Murray  |  July 26, 2018

Social impact bonds (SIBs) do not offer a silver bullet for solving social problems, writes Murray, but they may represent the first expression of a new form of capitalism that optimizes risk for return and impact....

Is the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative the Future of Philanthropy?

Is the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative the Future of Philanthropy?

Dana Brakman Reiser  |  June 25, 2018

Although they didn't originate the concept, Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, gave the philanthropy LLC its "big reveal" when they launched the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative in December 2015. Brakman Reiser, a professor of law at Brooklyn Law School, explains why the vehicle is attractive to high-net-worth donors and, barring another round of tax reform, why it's here to stay....