Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Screening and Counseling Services in Clinical Settings

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Screening and Counseling Services in Clinical Settings

While nearly a third of all Americans are affected by intimate partner violence — including stalking, sexual violence, physical violence, and psychological aggression — young women and women of color experience such violence at higher rates, a report from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds. According to the report, Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Screening and Counseling Services in Clinical Settings (HTML or PDF, 15 pages), 26 percent of female victims first experience IPV before the age of 18, while 45 percent experience it between the ages of 18 and 24. The report also found that an estimated 54 percent of multiracial women, 48 percent of American Indian/Native Alaskan women, 45 percent of African-American women, 37 percent of white women, 34 percent of Latina women, and 18 percent of Asian-American/Pacific Islander women report experiencing IPV in their lifetimes (although Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders likely underreport IPV incidents due to cultural stigma). In addition, lesbian (40 percent), bisexual (60 percent), and HIV-positive (55 percent) women, as well as women entering substance abuse treatment (90 percent), have higher rates of IPV victimization, while 69 percent of all women victims report at least one related impact, including concerns over personal safety, PTSD symptoms, injury, missing work or school, needing medical care, becoming pregnant, or contracting a sexually transmitted infection. The report notes that implementation of routine inquiries or screenings in healthcare settings can identify those experiencing IPV, increase their access to resources, reduce the abuse they experience, and improve their clinical and social outcomes.