KFF and Washington Post Frontline Health Care Workers Survey

KFF and Washington Post Frontline Health Care Workers Survey

A year-plus into the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline healthcare workers say the public health crisis is taking a toll on their physical and mental health, a survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Washington Post finds. Based on responses from more than thirteen hundred healthcare workers, the KFF and Washington Post Frontline Health Care Workers Survey (32 pages, PDF) found that healthcare workers believed COVID-19 has had a negative impact on their mental health (62 percent), physical health (49 percent), and relationships with their families (42 percent) and co-workers (41 percent). Eight in ten healthcare workers also reported that concerns about being exposed to COVID-19 (81 percent) and about exposing members of their household (79 percent) were a source of stress, while 63 percent said concerns about having sufficient personal protective equipment (PPE) was a source of stress and 34 percent reported running out of PPE. Roughly half of respondents said they felt anxious (49 percent) about going to work or burned out (55 percent), while 13 percent reported receiving mental health services or medication in the past year and 18 percent said they thought they needed mental health care but did not get it because they were too busy, were afraid to seek care, could not afford it, or could not get the time off from work.

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