Listening to what trust in news means to users: qualitative evidence from four countries

Listening to what trust in news means to users: qualitative evidence from four countries

Public trust in news organizations often revolves around uninformed impressions related to brand identity and is rarely rooted in the details of an organization's reporting practices or editorial standards, a report from the Reuters Institute at the University of Oxford finds. Based on interviews and focus groups held in early 2021 in Brazil, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States, the report, Listening to what trust in news means to users: qualitative evidence from four countries, found that familiarity with brands and their reputations offline often shaped how audiences thought about news content online. According to the report, only a small number of focus group members in each country expressed confidence in their understanding of how journalism works or the decision-making and news gathering processes that shape how the news is made. Instead, many focused more on matters of style or qualities related to the presentation of news as a more useful signal of perceived quality or reliability.