Perceptions of Discrimination and Unfair Judgment While Seeking Health Care

Perceptions of Discrimination and Unfair Judgment While Seeking Health Care

Black Americans are more than twice as likely as Latinx individuals and nearly three times as likely as white Americans to report experiencing discrimination or negative judgments in healthcare settings, a report from the Urban Institute and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation finds. Based on a survey fielded in September 2020 of more than four thousand adults between the ages of 18 and 64, the report, Perceptions of Discrimination and Unfair Judgment While Seeking Health Care: Findings from September 2021 Coronavirus Tracking Survey (17 pages, PDF), found that 5.1 percent of all respondents, 10.6 percent of Black respondents, 4.5 percent of Latinx respondents, and 3.6 percent of white respondents said they had been discriminated against or judged unfairly by a doctor, healthcare provider, or provider staff during the previous twelve months. When asked about the reasons for the discrimination or negative judgment, 7.9 percent of Black respondents cited race/ethnicity, compared with 3.8 percent of Latinx respondents and 1.1 percent of white respondents, followed by health condition (5.7 percent, compared with 1.3 percent and 1.6 percent), gender or gender identity (3.7 percent vs. 2 percent and 2 percent), disability (3.2 percent vs. 0.7 percent and 1.3 percent), and sexual orientation (2.7 percent vs. 0.4 percent and 0.7 percent).

(Photo credit: GettyImages)

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