Public Education Funding Inequity in an Era of Increasing Concentration of Poverty and Resegregation

Public Education Funding Inequity in an Era of Increasing Concentration of Poverty and Resegregation

More than sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education ruled segregation in public education to be unconstitutional, the U.S. education system remains profoundly unequal, a report from the United States Commission on Civil Rights finds. According to the report, Public Education Funding Inequity in an Era of Increasing Concentration of Poverty and Resegregation (158 pages, PDF), inequities in school funding means that Title I schools with high percentages of low-income students often have less to spend on teachers' salaries than non-Title I schools. As a result of such funding inequities, low-income students and students of color tend to be relegated to schools with a shortage of quality teachers, instructional materials, and technology, as well as inadequate facilities and maintenance. Worsening trends in residential segregation and persistent poverty further exacerbate inequities in educational opportunity, with many children being denied access to quality schools simply because of where they live. The report's recommendations include increasing federal funding for education to supplement state funding; promoting the collection, monitoring, and evaluation of school spending data; and developing better mechanisms to assess the effectiveness of federal spending on education.