Students Weigh In, Part II: Learning & Well-Being During COVID-19

Students Weigh In, Part II: Learning & Well-Being During COVID-19

While the educational experience for most students in the U.S. in the fall of 2020 was better than their experience during the spring term, disparities in learning challenges remained, a survey by YouthTruth Student Survey finds. Based on responses from nearly twenty-nine thousand upper-elementary and secondary students, the report, Students Weigh In, Part II: Learning & Well-Being During COVID-19 (HTML or 28 pages, PDF), found that 61 percent of students surveyed between September and December agreed with the statement "In most of my classes, we learn a lot almost every day" — including 64 percent of those attending school in-person, 61 percent of those learning virtually, and 59 percent of those in a hybrid model — compared with 39 percent in May and June and 59 percent before the COVID-19 pandemic. More students than in the spring also said they felt they were a part of their school community (49 percent vs. 30 percent) and that their teachers were willing to give extra help on schoolwork if needed (66 percent vs. 58 percent). At the same time, English language learners and special education students were less likely to say they were able to access their schoolwork (84 percent and 86 percent) than non-English language learners and non-special education students (91 percent each). And nearly half (46 percent) of respondents said the fact they "[felt] depressed, stressed, or anxious" was an obstacle to virtual learning, with higher rates among Latinx, multiracial, and Black students than among white or Asian-American students. In addition, low-income students were more likely than higher-income students to report having limited or no access to Internet service (27 percent vs. 20 percent) or a computer (15 percent vs. 8 percent).

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