The State of America's Children

The State of America's Children

Black and brown children in the United States experienced the highest poverty rates before the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and have been disproportionately impacted by the economic and educational impacts of the virus in the months since it was declared a pandemic, an annual report from the Children's Defense Fund finds. According to the report, The State of America's Children, (HTML or 86 pages, PDF), about one in seven children — almost three-quarters (71 percent) of whom were children of color — lived in poverty as of 2019, including 26.5 percent of Black children, 20.8 percent of Latinx children, and 20.6 percent of American Indian/Alaska Native children, compared with 8.3 percent of white children and 7.7 percent of Asian-American/Pacific Islander children. In addition, more than one in three children lived in households with a high housing cost burden, while more than one in seven were food insecure and an estimated 4.4 million children were uninsured (an increase of 320,000 from 2018). The report also notes that during the pandemic, children of color as well as those with disabilities and those living in low-income and unemployed families and/or in rural communities faced numerous barriers to accessing quality remote education.

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