Using Integrated Data to Identify and Protect Children From Educational Risk

Using Integrated Data to Identify and Protect Children From Educational Risk

Integrated data systems can play a powerful role in addressing complex social issues — for example, minimizing risk factors that harm children's school readiness, a case study from the Annie E. Casey Foundation finds. The report, Using Integrated Data to Identify and Protect Children From Educational Risk (11 pages, PDF), examined how stakeholders in Cleveland combined rental property data and social services information to identify families living in or near substandard or financially distressed housing and thus more likely to have children who were exposed to lead, suffer maltreatment, or be subjected to frequent moves — all factors that impede children's readiness for school. Indeed, according to the report, 40 percent of children in Cleveland who entered kindergarten between 2007 and 2010 had tested positive for elevated lead levels at some point in early childhood. The report urges city officials and community-based organizations working to protect children from lead poisoning and other hazards in their homes to use the database to enforce the city's rental registry requirement, initiate a regular cycle of home inspections, prioritize buildings for demolition, and create a mobile-friendly website that provides information related to lead hazards, code violations, and repair histories in specific housing units.