LLS announces collaborative grants totaling $17 million

LLS announces collaborative grants totaling $17 million

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has announced grants totaling up to $17 million in support of blood cancer research.

Funded in collaboration with the Mark Foundation for Cancer Research, Rally Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research, Snowdome Foundation, Leukaemia Foundation, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Jackson Laboratory, and Moffitt Cancer Center, the awards include approximately $9 million in new research grants, with up to $8 million more in funding anticipated over the next year. Recipients include Michael R. Green (MD Anderson), in support of research focused on a mutation in the CREBBP gene that seems to trigger an immune response in patients with follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; Therese Vu (University of Colorado School of Medicine), whose research is focused on combination therapies for patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); Sylvain Simon (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center), whose research explores the underlying biological mechanisms that result in many patients treated with CAR T-cell therapy experiencing the toxic immune response known as cytokine release syndrome (CRS); and John Pimanda (University of New South Wales), in support of a project dedicated to identifying those patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) most likely to and unlikely to respond to azacitidine, the most common drug therapy for MDS patients.

"Since our founding in 1949, LLS has invested nearly $1.3 billion to fuel groundbreaking research that has touched nearly every therapy used to treat patients with blood cancers," said LLS chief scientific officer Lee Greenberger. "But we can't do it alone. Particularly in light of the fiscal challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic, LLS is grateful to have the partnership of these renowned foundations, centers, and individuals to help us continue to deliver on our mission to find cures. This is not the time to take our foot off the accelerator when so much potential progress can be realized right now."