Mount Sinai receives $10 million gift for melanoma, skin cancer center

Mount Sinai receives $10 million gift for melanoma, skin cancer center

Mount Sinai Health System in New York City has announced a $10 million gift from Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman and their family to establish a melanoma and skin cancer center.

To be housed within the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology at the May Center for Mount Sinai Doctors, the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center, in partnership with the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai, will provide comprehensive, coordinated services across the health system. With the goal of advancing early melanoma and skin cancer diagnosis, treatment, and research, the center will bring doctors and scientists together to exchange clinical insights and laboratory findings and give patients access to the newest diagnostics and therapies, including Canfield Vectra180, a 3-D whole-body imaging system able to identify early skin cancer lesions; Nevisense, a diagnostic support tool that uses electrical impedence spectroscopy (EIS); Vivascope 1500, a confocal imaging system that offers a non-invasive way to image the skin down to the superficial collagen layers; and innovative technologies that non-invasively collect skin cells to diagnose atypical pigmented lesions (or moles) at high risk for melanoma.

"The Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center will capitalize on the benefits of Mount Sinai's expertise in translational research and provide patients with early detection and prevention, new therapies, and outside-the-box research approaches at one of the most advanced centers in the country," said Emma Guttman-Yassky, Waldman Professor and chair of the Waldman Department of Dermatology. "I am honored the Waldman family is sharing their generous support for this new state-of-the art center that will help position Mount Sinai as a leader in this field."

"Kimberly and I are proud to support this new and innovative initiative," said Eric Waldman. "We look forward to the advancement of scientific discoveries in melanoma, help patients receive the best care possible for this disease, and potentially save thousands of lives."